YOUTH ART MONTH

WHAT IS YOUTH ART MONTH?

Started in 1961 through the Art & Creative Materials Institute, Inc. (ACMI) and in cooperation with NAEA, the Council for Art Education (CFAE) administers Youth Art Month at the national level. Festivities take place annually, traditionally each March, to celebrate visual arts for grades K – 12. The Youth Art Month Program emphasizes the value of art education for all children, encourages support for quality school art programs, and promotes art material safety.

 

Youth Art Month also provides a forum for recognizing skills developed through visual arts experiences that are not possible in other curriculum subjects.

 

Youth Art Month exists to

1. Recognize art education as a viable factor in the total education curricula that develops citizens of a global society.

2. Recognize art is a necessity for the full development of better quality of life for all.

3. Direct attention to the value of art education for divergent and critical thinking.

4. Expand art programs in schools and stimulate new art programs.

5. Encourage commitment to the arts by students, community organizations, and individuals everywhere.

6. Provide additional opportunities for individuals of all ages to participate in creative art learning.

7. Increase community, business and governmental support for art education.

8. Increase community understanding and interest in art and art education through involvement in art exhibits, workshops, and other creative ventures.

9. Reflect and demonstrate the goals of the National Art Education Association that work toward the improvement of art education at all levels.

 

FLAG PROGRAM

Flag Program To promote Youth Art Month, the Council for Art Education coordinates Youth Art Month activities at the national level. The primary event is the State Flag Program. Each state coordinates a flag design contest, with the winning design made into a flag for display in the Youth Art Month Museum at the National Art Education Association Convention in March.

 

FLAG CONTEST GUIDELINES

The 2016/2017 theme has not yet been announced. As soon as updated information is distributed to our YAM Coordinator it will be announced and posted here.

 

The 2015/2016 Wyoming and national theme is The Power of Art.”

 

Student work should:

- Incorporate The Power of Art as the theme.

- Creatively use images that represent the state or represent art.

- Incorporate the words "Youth Art Month" or "Wyoming" if possible.

 

Student Entry Form

Entry Permission Form

 

The deadline for entry submission is January 11, 2016.

 

QUESTIONS? Contact WYAEA YAM Coordinator Amy McCormick Kopperud at amy@wyarted.org or 503.554.3823

 

FLAG CONTEST AWARDS

We have a newly added prize structure offered by Sargent Art!!!!

 

Elementary Division Winner - Art supplies and a Certificate

Middle Level Division Winner - Art supplies and a Certificate

High School Division Winner - Art supplies and a Certificate

 

Overall State Design Winner - The winning student, her/his (one) parent and the Art Teacher will be awarded an expenses paid trip to New York to visit Art Museums.

 

All submissions will be displayed on our website after contest is over and the winners announced.

 

 

 

Sargent Art Logo links to their website

POSITION

STATEMENTS

Position statements define a particular problem, issue or need and describe its relevance to art education. These statements address important and timely policy issues relevant to art education. They are created on the foundation provided by NAEA. Each position statement defines NAEA's position or answers a question central to the issue. Position statements are approved and reviewed through a rigorous process, described here.

 

To see the position statements up for review at the NAEA March 2016 conference and offer input or suggestions please click here.

 

To see the full list of position statements, please click here.

 

 

Anyone who is curious as to what NAEA or WYAEA have to say about a particular problem, topic or issue.  This is not limited to art educators, it also includes supervisors, administrators, general educators, community members, law makers, parents, business owners, artists, other agencies, and even architects as they plan and design new schools.

 

 

 

For 2016 the Wyoming Delegate is WYAEA President Abi Paytoe Gbayee. She is taking input from art educators across Wyoming regarding the position statements up for review to the Delegate Assembly. If you would like to contribute any comments or give any feedback to be represented at the Delegate Assembly please contact Abi here.

 

The delegate from Wyoming is usually the President or President-Elect, however it can be any willing member appointed by the President, if the President or President-Elect is unable to attend the NAEA Delegate's Assembly at the NAEA Conference.

 

WHO USES POSITION

STATEMENTS?

OUR VOICE &

DELEGATE

WAYS TO ADVOCATE

COMMUNICATE A CLEAR MESSAGE

-The message is the answer to the question: "Why is learning in the visual arts essential to education in the 21st century?”

-Use data.

-Tell compelling personal stories.

-Tap into your Network's values and concerns.

-Make your message VISIBLE.

NAEA has developed key messages including the overall theme of

Learning in A Visual Age - click here to access this great resource!

 

BE VISIBLE

-Make an advocacy plan.

-Get out of the art room/studio and into the community with your MESSAGE.

-Capitalize on the “visual” part of the visual arts.

-Show your NETWORK what visual literacy, 21st century college and career readiness, and engaged learning look like through exhibitions, media stories and community events.

REMEMBER: The work and “voices” of your students are the most compelling.

 

ACTIVATE AN ADVOCACY NETWORK

-Identify and build an advocacy network. Action requires committed people. Include media, legislators, education decision makers and parents.

-Work with your state/regional NAEA organization to partner with your state Alliance for Arts Education affiliate and your state’s arts advocacy citizens group.

-Communicate your MESSAGE to your network.

-Leverage your network to impact policy and budget.

-Keep your network engaged by being VISIBLE.

-Activate your network in times of crisis.

REMEMBER: A parent network can be your most effective advocacy tool. Think social networking.

 

GET MORE GREAT IDEAS AND TOOLS

NAEA has an amazing array of resources, tools and ideas to help you showcase what you do best. Click here to access their advocacy page.

 

 

 

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